Groundbreaking Research: The Motor Basis for Misophonia With Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian

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Groundbreaking Research: The Motor Basis for Misophonia With Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian

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Title:  Groundbreaking Research: The Motor Basis for Misophonia With Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian

Date: June 24th

Time: 4PM EST

Description:

We are very excited to announce that Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian  will present the results of their recently published GROUNDBREAKING misophonia study, “The motor basis for Misophonia” (https://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2021/05/20/JNEUROSCI.0261-21.2021).

This webinar will present the findings of this study, explain the results and what this means for future misophonia research. Kumar and Erfanian will be available for questions at the end of the webinar, as well as Dr. Jennifer Jo Brout of the IMRN for any other questions.

 

Links are sent the DAY OF the presentation via the PAYPAL billing email address.

Description

Title:  Groundbreaking Research: The Motor Basis for Misophonia With Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian

Date: June 24th

Time: 4PM EST

 Description:

We are very excited to announce that Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar and Mercede Erfanian  will present the results of their recently published GROUNDBREAKING misophonia study, “The motor basis for Misophonia” (https://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2021/05/20/JNEUROSCI.0261-21.2021).

This webinar will present the findings of this study, explain the results and what this means for future misophonia research. Kumar and Erfanian will be available for questions at the end of the webinar, as well as Dr. Jennifer Jo Brout of the IMRN for any other questions.

The following significance statement is offered with the paper:

“Conventionally, misophonia, literally ‘hatred of sounds’ has been considered as a disorder of sound emotion processing, in which ‘simple’ eating and chewing sounds produced by others cause negative emotional responses. Our data provide an alternative but complementary perspective on misophonia that emphasizes the action of the trigger-person rather than the sounds which are a by-product of that action. Sounds, in this new perspective, are only a ‘medium’ via which action of the triggering-person is mirrored onto the listener. This change in perspective has important consequences for devising therapies and treatment methods for misophonia. It suggests that instead of focusing on sounds, which many existing therapies do, effective therapies should target the brain representation of movement” (Kumar et al., 2021).

Presenters

Sukhbinder Kumar, Ph.D.
Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar is a neuroscientist and is currently working as a Research Fellow at Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, University College London (UCL) and Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University (UK). He received his Ph.D. from Newcastle University (UK) in 2004. His research concerns understanding brain mechanisms of auditory perception, cognition and emotion processing in normal human subjects and how these mechanisms go wrong in disorders of perception such as musical hallucinations and disorders of emotion processing such as misophonia. To address these questions he uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetencephalography (MEG) combined with computational modeling and behavioral testing. Dr. Kumar has published over 30 peer-reviewed articles in neuroscience journals and recently published “The brain basis for misophonia,” in Current Biology (2017) with co-authors S, Tansley-Hancock O, Sedley W, Winston JS, Callaghan MF, Allen M, Cope TE, Gander PE, Bamiou D-E, and Griffiths TD. For Dr. Kumar’s full publication list, please see https://www.ncl.ac.uk/ion/staff/profile/sukhbinderkumar.html#publications

In our previous fMRI study (Kumar et al., 2017, Current Biology) we identified the brain areas which are hyperactive (compared to controls) in response to trigger sounds in participants with misophonia. However, fMRI being ‘slow’ in measuring the brain activity, it cannot measure the moment-by-moment changes (dynamics) in the brain activity. The aim of the present study is determine the dynamics of the brain activity, which can be measured at the scalp using electroencephalography (EEG) or magnetencephalography (MEG). One advantage of measuring this activity is instead of using expensive measuring device such as fMRI, a relatively cheaper set-up, such as EEG, can be used for measurement of brain response, which has the potential of being useful for therapeutic purposes.

Mercede Erfanian
Mercede Erfanian has a background in clinical psychology and neuroscience with a particular focus on affective disorders. Her research concerns understanding brain mechanisms in patients with mood and anxiety disorders. At the moment her research focus is specific to Misophonia, its brain mechanisms, cognitive and emotional characteristics and co-morbidity with affective disorders. In 2015, She joint the International Misophonia Research Network (IMRN) and She is currently collaborating with Dr. Sukhbinder Kumar on a joint study, at the universities of Newcastle. Recently, she has started an EU funded project (Soundscape Indices SSID) in the department of environmental design and engineering (IEDE) of UCL (Acoustic Group). Her research aims to achieve a ground-breaking development through the establishment of ‘soundscape indices’ (SSID), adequately reflecting levels of human comfort. This will provide the underpinning science for soundscape in the field of human sound/auditory perception.

For Ms. Erfanian’s publications https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Mercede_Erfanian2

Links are sent the DAY OF the presentation via the PAYPAL billing email address.